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Genealogy Librarians

Discussion Genealogy Committee Meeting minutes, Boston 2010

by Janice Schultz on Sun, Jan 24, 2010 at 07:02 pm

Genealogy Committee

17 January 2010

Intercontinental Hotel, Boston

 

 

Introductions:

 

Kim Harrison              kharrison@ancestry.com                     member

Mary Mannix              mkmannix@gmail.com                       non-member

Curt Witcher               cwitcher@acpl.info                             member

Genealogy Committee

17 January 2010

Intercontinental Hotel, Boston

 

 

Introductions:

 

Kim Harrison              kharrison@ancestry.com                     member

Mary Mannix              mkmannix@gmail.com                       non-member

Curt Witcher               cwitcher@acpl.info                             member

Ruth Carr                    rcarr@nypl.org                                    member

Dave Dowell               dave@ddowell.com                            member

Connie Reik                connie.reik@tufts.edu                                    non-member

Tom Kemp                  Thomas.J.Kemp@gmail.com              member

Christopher Strauss     Strauss@unt.edu                                 non-member

Kathy Strauss              Kathy.strauss@cityofdenton.com      non-member

William Forsyth          William.forsyth@proquest.com          non-member

Joseph Ditta                jditta@nyhistory.org                           non-member

Thom Edlund              thom_edlund@byu.edu                      non-member

Elaine Powers             epowers@ucom.vt.edu                       non-member

Mary Bogan                mbogan@emporia.edu                        member

Barbara Pilvin            

Diane Loosle               LoosleDC@familysearh.org               non-member

 

  1. A presentation of the Family Search WIKI was presented by Diane Loosle from Family Search.
    1. Created because printed sources/guides go out-of-date so quickly.
    2. WIKI was first created internally and it was very successful
    3. Examples:  Diane created a WIKI page for a English Parish she was researching and there are good Scandinavian and American Indian pages
    4. It is free
    5. Family Search Forums are available on which queries can be posted.  Helpful when you can’t think of a way to help a patron.
    6. It is a way to stay current
    7. One can network:  discussion pages, user pages, contact information
    8. You can find out what kinds of things contributors are adding to the WIKI.
    9. Patrons can contribute
    10. Promote your library on a page.  Show what you have to offer.  Highlight your collections.
    11. The WIKI is not a part of the main Family Search site yet – it is still in a BETA form.
    12. Everyone who contributes has a user page.
    13. There is a “help” link with step-by-step instructions.  If you can’t find what you need on the help page then click on ‘forum.’
    14. You can put a “watch” on your page to be contacted when someone edits your page.  Every page has a history of its activity
    15. The site was given a soft launch two years ago.  At this time there are 21,000 contact pages.
    16. The WIKI has a fan page on Facebook
    17. Family Search is posting training classes on their education page (Under library).  There are about 30 so far.
    18. The WIKI is searchable from search engines.  About 30% of the traffic is from search engines.
    19. The more edits a page has the better its quality
    20. Templates are available when creating a page.

 

  1. Jack Simpson has created a Genealogy Community on ALA Connect.  It may have potential and then again, may not be necessary.
  2. An author, Ron Arons, has asked to speak at our committee meeting in DC.  The committee declined his offer.
  3. Sharing:
    1. Ray Wright wrote by email that he is revising the Genealogist’s Handbook.  ALA will publish.  Sometime this first quarter ALA will launch a blog for input on what should be in the book.
    2. Tom Kemp shared the status of America’s Genealogy Bank.  There are over 42,000 newspaper titles and African American newspapers are being added.
    3. Tom also added that he sees an upswing in interest in genealogy.  Bill Forsyth added that there seems to be also more interest in family reunions.
    4. Connie Reik is adding and perfecting her class on military participation and she has been researching more on her father’s participation in World War II.
    5. Dave Dowell has registered the Dowell name as a one-name study.  He also said genetic genealogy is taking a new turn by doing a full genome study.  He has been asked to write a crash course in doing genealogy by Libraries Unlimited
    6. Ruth Carr – a colleague recently retired and was replaced by a younger person who has a great knowledge in archival research.  Between this person and two other young people on staff, more is being done with Blogging, Facebook, and Twitter.
    7. Ruth also gave an update on the cataloging of the NYGBS materials donated to them.  It is going well.  450,000 genealogy papers from the collection will soon be in the catalog.  These are file folders or boxes and are being cataloged by those who normally catalog manuscript collections.  The microfilm in the NYGBS collection compliments the NYPL collections.  Per the agreement with the Society, quarterly genealogy lecture series are being presented in the library.
    8. Who Do You Think You Are? did some filming at the NYPL and Ruth is seen briefly.
    9. Kim Harrison commented on Ancestry’s part in the WDYTYA program series.  They are a commercial sponsor.  It will debut in March and she feels libraries will be overwhelmed with a new Roots-like interest forming in genealogy.
    10. Elaine Powers works at an Osteopathic College.  The Dean has created a database of Osteopathic literature.  Elaine wants to pull names out of the collection.
    11. Diane – The number of scanned books in Family History Archive is over 55,000.  She reminded everyone of the upcoming NGS Conference in Salt Lake City.
    12. Joseph Ditta – He has been at the New York Historical Society since 1998.  He has an interest in the Gravesend area of New York and has published a book on that area for Arcadia.  He has been abstracting and indexing everything on Gravesend “forever.”
    13. Mary Bogan mentioned that she and Janice Schultz are organizing a pre-conference at the Kansas Library Association conference in April
    14. Kathy Strauss has had vinegar syndrome occur in her newspaper microfilm.  She wrote a grant to replace the papers for the 1960s which have experienced the worst of the problem.  She said it is something for those of us with microfilm collections to watch out for.

 

 

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RUSA CODES Materials Reviewing Committee (Collection Development and Evaluation Section)

Online Doc Reference Book Reviewing Checklist

by Michael Bemis on Sun, Jan 24, 2010 at 04:23 pm

REFERENCE BOOK REVIEW CHECKLIST

 

Prepared by Mike Bemis, MLIS

With the assistance of the RUSA CODES Materials Reviewing Committee

 

Last Revision: January, 2010

 

 

TITLE OF BOOK: __________________________________________________________________________

 

REVIEW FOR: ____________________________________________________________________________

 

REFERENCE BOOK REVIEW CHECKLIST

 

Prepared by Mike Bemis, MLIS

With the assistance of the RUSA CODES Materials Reviewing Committee

 

Last Revision: January, 2010

 

 

TITLE OF BOOK: __________________________________________________________________________

 

REVIEW FOR: ____________________________________________________________________________

 

DEADLINE: ______________________________________________________________________________

 

 

PART 1 - REGARDING THE BOOK ITSELF

 

 

I.  Authority (trustworthiness).

 

            A.  Credentials of author/editor (check author info blurb in book, C.V. search online)

                       

                        1.  Education level (Ph.D. is preferred, since emphasis is on scholarship)

 

  1. Field of study, name of institution and year of graduation

 

                        2.  Publication history

 

  1. Other works regarding topic or similar subject as book under review

 

  1. Awards or other recognition for previously published works

 

3.  Membership/leadership in professional organizations

 

4.  Experience/employment (college professor, writer, independent scholar, etc.)

 

5. Basic question to be answered: how well suited is this person to be responsible for book

     under review?  

 

            B.  Credentials of contributors

           

                        1.  Contributors list (names of writers of individual entries, their affiliations, etc.)

 

            C.  Reputation of publisher and/or sponsoring agency (if any)

 

  1. Brief note about history of company

 

  1. Award winning titles of the past

 

  1. Subject specialty, if any

 

           

D.  Preface/Introduction

 

                        1.  Rationale for producing this work

 

                        2.  Product is in line with stated objectives

 

            E.  Currency (up-to-dateness)

 

                        1.  Bibliography/Further Reading List contains recent titles

 

2.  Note if title is a revision of a previous work.  Compare representative entries for  

     amount/extent of new material.  If longstanding work, are new editions produced at regular 

     intervals?

           

            F.  Sources

 

  1.  Where did information come from? How was it obtained?

 

  1. Original research?

 

  1. Rehash of other reference works?

 

  1. Reliance on experts or other outside contributors?

 

 

II.  Scope (breadth of coverage).

 

            A.  Number of entries

 

            B.  Length of entries

 

            C.  Number of volumes

 

            D.  Number of pages per volume

 

            E.  Range of material presented (variety of topics)

 

                        1.  Discuss overall theme or core subject matter; give examples by citing specific entries

 

 

III.  Analysis (depth of coverage)

 

            A.  Journalism's famous five W's: who, what, where, when, why

 

            B.  Mere listing of facts or emphasis on interpretation and significance of material presented?

 

            C.  Essential question: what does it all mean?

 

 

 

 

 

IV.  Treatment (technique and handling).

 

            A.  Facts listed are accurate and complete

 

            B.  Writing is objective (lack of bias)

 

            C.  Style and level of writing

 

                        1.  Target audience: adult or child, scholar or layman, etc.

 

                        2.  General readability of text: concise or verbose, jargon vs. plain English

 

 

V.  Organization (arrangement; order of material).

 

            A.  Alphabetical, chronological, topical, etc.

 

            B.  Access points (table of contents, indexes, cross-references, etc.)

 

 

VI.  Format (physical attributes).

 

            A.  Page size

 

            B.  Type of paper (plain or coated, opacity, general quality, etc.)

 

            C.  Binding (hardcover or paperback, pages glued or stitched, etc.)

 

            D.  Layout (white space, type size, font, etc.)

 

            E.  Illustrations (photographs/maps/tables/charts; also, number, size, b/w or color, etc.)

 

            F.  Note whether or not book is available in other versions (e-book, electronic database, etc.)

 

 

VII.  Special Features (distinctive aspects).

 

            A.  Check for and make note of additions or extras that add value to work, such as: appendixes,                                            bibliography, user's guide, timeline or chronology, etc.

 

 

VIII.  Summation/Conclusion.

 

            A.  Comparison to similar volume(s)/set(s).  Note whether this is a unique work.  If similar titles exist, note amount of overlap/duplication and relative merits for each.  Give full bibliographic information for other books cited in review.

 

            B.  Suitability of book for acquisition - make recommendation for purchase or not.  If affirmative, list types of libraries/collections for which work would be most appropriate.  

 

           

 

PART 2 - REGARDING THE WRITTEN REVIEW

 

 

  1. Organize the review into three distinct sections:

 

            A.  Citation of work under review, giving full bibliographic information.  Example:

                        Chronology of American History. By John C. Fredriksen. Facts on File Library of American

                        History. New York: Facts on File, 2008. 4 vols. alkaline $350 (ISBN 978-0-8160-6800-5).

           

            B. The review itself.

 

            C. Reviewer name, job title, affiliation. Example:

                        Robert B. Example

                        Assistant Librarian

                        Anywhere Public Library

                        Anywhere, Minnesota

 

D. Pay attention to the specified word count for the publication in question

 

                       

  1. Comparison and Correlation

 

A.  Check for similar titles from other publishers by using following resources:

 

1.      American Reference Books Annual (ARBA) – five or six most recent editions

2.      ALA Guide to Reference Books (no longer in print – online version only)

3.      Walford’s Guide to Reference Material

4.      Books in Print

5.      Worldcat Online

 

B. Comment on relative strengths and weaknesses regarding said similar titles, any overlap of material 

      between the other(s) and if one title is to be preferred over the other(s)

 

  1. Style and Usage

 

  1. Consult Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, for questions regarding grammar

 

 

 

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RUSA CODES Materials Reviewing Committee (Collection Development and Evaluation Section)

Discussion Reference Book Reviewing Checklist

by Michael Bemis on Sun, Jan 24, 2010 at 04:18 pm

Dear Members:

     As you know, Drew Alfgren was kind enough to post the RUSA general book reviewing guidelines here on our connect page. As you also are aware, I developed my own specific guidelines just for reference book reviewing, and some of you gave me helpful suggestions on how to improve it. I have now posted this special checklist on conncect, for whomever wishes to download it for thier use.

 

Sincerely,

Mike Bemis

Chair, Materials Reviewing Committee

 

FAFLRT Executive Board (Federal and Armed Forces Libraries Round Table)

Discussion ALA Executive Board Talking Points

by Diane Chen on Sat, Jan 16, 2010 at 10:46 am

Attached please find the ALA Executive Board talking points that I will share with the FAFLRT during ALA Midwinter. Due to our limited time, I am sharing the document with you here and will highlight several points in person. I am always here for you to communicate your concerns, questions, and celebrations.

Attached please find the ALA Executive Board talking points that I will share with the FAFLRT during ALA Midwinter. Due to our limited time, I am sharing the document with you here and will highlight several points in person. I am always here for you to communicate your concerns, questions, and celebrations.

Let me tell you a little bit about myself. I am a school library information specialist for over 1000 middle school students in the Nashville area. I have lived and taught in Taiwan, Germany (for DoDDS), Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, and Tennessee. I have 4 sons, 2 are 18 and 2 are 20. Both of my oldest sons serve with the US Army in Afghanistan currently. I have taught for public, DoDDS, and DDESS schools and volunteered at the library on the military base in Ansbach, Germany. I support federal and armed forces libraries and am thrilled to be your liaison.

Thank you.

Diane

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Emerging Technologies Interest Group (LITA)

Discussion Midwinter 2010 Minutes and Discussion Notes

by James Hahn on Sat, Jan 23, 2010 at 07:18 am

LITA Emerging Technologies Interest Group

ALA Mid Winter Meeting Minutes and Notes

Sunday January 17th 1:30-3:30pm

Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, Room 258C

Attendees: ~ 45

I. Planning for program at ALA Annual 2010.

LITA Emerging Technologies Interest Group

ALA Mid Winter Meeting Minutes and Notes

Sunday January 17th 1:30-3:30pm

Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, Room 258C

Attendees: ~ 45

I. Planning for program at ALA Annual 2010.

Bohyun Kim -
I. Catching up, bring us up to speed from Emerging Technology at annual (2009 Chicago). Introducing the call for proposal: the program planning for ALA Annual. Discussed what the title of emerging technology means. What types of things are expected, and what can you do for the library?
*    What are the challenges for emerging technologies for libraries? (From both a manager’s, a librarian’s, and a technologist's perspective)
*    How do you evaluate, implement and adopt emerging technologies?
*    What should libraries be doing about emerging technologies?

Saturday 1:30 - 3pm at Annual in D.C.is the program -- visit ALA connect to submit form.

II. Roundtable discussion on Emerging Technologies -

(Background: Annual in Chicago 2009 - was about open source initiatives - OLE: open library environment)

What is emerging right now?
Things that have been around but not implemented at a Large Scale.

Any technologies you've heard at the conference

DISCUSSION NOTES

iPhone SDK (frameworks like the PhoneGap Framework Discussed http://phonegap.com/>)

Question from the floor what do libraries use mobile for right now?

- University of Florida iPhone app has SobekPH can be downloaded from the Library website. A way to browse digital collections. http://library.gameology.org/2009/11/24/iphone/>

- Catalog search is a good starting place for beginning iPhone

UNC Chapel Hill has a catalog search on iPhone. Students like being able to search the catalog from a mobile catalog. (mobile catalog is web based). http://www.lib.unc.edu/m/>

It is suggested that an iPhone app would help meet directional questions -- maps of what exists where/basic information.

Abeline Christian University makes access to all web content iPhone friendly. Students love the mobile friendly WorldCat.

Ebsco now has a mobile app. http://www.ebscohost.com/thisTopic.php?marketID=1&topicID=1336> Professors at Abeline Christian want content to be iPhone friendly.

UNLV - working on launching a mobile site has frames for a mobile site.

Is it applications or is it just a website you are working on?
-the idea of the mobile catalog is good. Students txt the call number to their phone.

Apps with directional information. Self guided video tour "ugl4eva" web based iPhone app at the University of Illinois http://www.library.illinois.edu/ugl/about/Experimental_iPhone_Apps/orientationapps.html>

What experiences do libraries have with e-readers? E-book applications?
 From top tech trends

http://blioreader.com/>

Suggestions of things to get students up to speed on new emerging technology? Where you can get training of emerging technology? http://www.educause.edu/7Things>

Do libraries provide readers to customers?

Dartmouth College - six Kindles circulate... (How many titles get circulated? titles are devices specific...) these circulate for one week. It's new and many people are more interested in the device than the titles. (No newspapers). Acquisitions department purchases the titles and loans them on the devices. Publisher policies? Purchasing with credit card.

Q: How do vendors work with downloading titles directly to device?

Overdrive has a mobile web app link to Android & Microsoft software http://www.overdrive.com/software/omc/> (allows the users to download directly to their device). Baker & Taylor talking about this too. E-brary has something in the works.

-- Q: How do you adopt new technology when you are a small library and there is no money?
A: Library networks. Leverage network resources that can be adapted, and leverage student interest and teachers. State and Regional Associations for libraries -- how to make use of these resources? Webcasts for different technologies, workshops for these. Look for state and regional, or library system provided workshops on Web 2.0: how to create wikis, blogs, and best practices. 23 things, public library systems. Providing technology assistance. Staff sharing with staff and offering some of these services for the Public.

Florida has resources like the FCLA: Florida Center for Library Automation, they provide trainings on anything new. There is also Regional Library network support. These offer support for the things.

The Bunker Hill Community College: student users are very diverse. Team with a local University. University of Mass. provided training for learning 2.0 stuff to be interested in many different tools.

National Network of Libraries and Medicine -- offers training and workshops on Web 2.0 podcasting.

Wyoming Library Network -- state library leverage LSTA money to get people familiar with RSS podcast, wiki, and all. Using web conferencing software.

NEW TOPIC what is after web 2.0: Semantic Web Technology (discussion)

 National Science Foundation funded here. National Science Digital Library Project  http://nsdl.org/> -- the standard for articulating JES&CO. WWW.JESANDCO.ORG (learning objectives in RDF. the National Science Digital project is all open source)

What is next? But what is left to do in the 2.0 realm.

Leads to a discussion of what this group (emerging tech) does: is 2.0 done / what is 3.0

Emerging technology - things that are out there that are being implemented. (Avatars?)

(A library site that works like the Wii -- gesture based or experience based)

Kiosks -- VOIP kiosks. Library presence wherever you place KIOSKS.


A way for people to ask questions from one location to another.

Using SKYPE with study abroad location. The student was able to get in depth research via Skype -- Skype allows screen sharing -- so it can be success for international reference type help.

Polling software and clicker software -- for feedback is getting a lot of traction? What enhances training or active learning?

Experimenting with using mind maps, in education -- wants to build a class "Flow of Scientific Information". That is one piece. Have the kids build it. This helps kids structure their thoughts and their time. The software is getting cheaper. (MindMiester)

Educause "7 things to know about” http://www.educause.edu/7Things> - read about Google jockeying

Geographic Based Interfaces - people are very interested in geospatial information.
How using ARCGis - to illustrate collections and regions.

Locate Feature in Catalog. http://uf.catalog.fcla.edu/uf.jsp>

a MapIT feature on all devices. The catalog points out the range of shelf that the item is located within. Probably will be expanded further? To every building on campus, for campus wide use. (Florida International - Aleph/Endeca/Mango implantation). http://fiu.catalog.fcla.edu/fi.jsp>

** NYPL map department for more information. http://drupal02.nypl.org/blogs/subject/maps>

Follow up on implementing or adopting open source: VUFIND applications,
And other open source projects http://oleproject.org/>

Mellon Grant Funded Project for JSTOR

DECAPOD Project .. all open source all open access... http://sites.google.com/site/decapodproject/>

Digitizing of long-tail material.... (Open Source Development)

National Institute for Technology Education http://www.nitle.org/> (Barley, Wellesley College).

This is a hardware/software project -- the software part has to do with the open source OCR engine... built to address the needs of smaller institutions, also for items that cannot be sent to institutions. This will be more inclusive also of other languages script.

Stuff we want to keep on the front burner:

**Follow up on Annual Planning of Open Source stuff follow up.
**Themes for programming: using technology for accessibility; learning disabilities; the plain text catalog -- this will perform better on screen readers -- a program: balancing format with emerging technologies, not diminishing the value of traditional formats... -- working with people to test stuff on screen readers before going forward -- ... all of the different Drupal applications -- Iowa state University guy giving presentation on Drupal... -- entymology page at Iowa State University -- curious of the potential future of Google Wave and that protocol for what it can potentially do; what it is down the pipe with Google wave? (Challenges where it falls apart when it gets too big; but for smaller projects works OK -- librarians using this across the country for their meetings) ---

Q. What is Google wave?
A. Akin to virtually attending meetings in real time -- but if you cannot you can replay Google conversations -- the ability to drop links, and documents in, in real-time (the drag and drop format is very good all members of the wave can edit documents at the same time...)

Suggestions -- jump in to a public wave -- try out a LITA wave.

jump in here: too, http://worldcat.org/devnet

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Genealogy Librarians

Discussion Why is genealogical reference perceived to be different?

by David Dowell on Thu, Jan 7, 2010 at 08:29 am

I was recently at a conference and overheard a comment that when a genealogy patron appeared all of this librarian's colleages tried to disappear into the woodwork.  If this is true, why do library workers fear family history researchers?  Are genealogists a different breed than other researchers?  Are librarians unfamiliar with genealogy research tools and methodologies?  Are the collections inadequate to meet the need? Or, .....?

2017 Emerging Leaders

Discussion Congratulations to Maureen Sullivan!

by Peter Bromberg on Thu, Jan 21, 2010 at 06:42 pm

Congrats to Emerging Leader Facilitator Maureen Sullivan on being named ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year! 

The ACRL Insider article states,

The award, sponsored by YBP Library Services, recognizes an outstanding member of the library profession who has made a significant national or international contribution to academic/research librarianship and library development.

Congrats to Emerging Leader Facilitator Maureen Sullivan on being named ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year! 

The ACRL Insider article states,

The award, sponsored by YBP Library Services, recognizes an outstanding member of the library profession who has made a significant national or international contribution to academic/research librarianship and library development.

“Maureen’s career has been deeply influential across the spectrum,” said Barbara Jenkins, chair of the ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year Award Committee and Director for Instruction and Campus Partnerships at the University of Oregon. “Her work in organizational development and strategic planning has had a unique and lasting impact on many individuals and organizations. Almost single handedly, she ushered academic libraries into the world of effective strategic planning - strategic planning that has had a significant impact on how we engage our students, faculty and others who use our libraries. She has been a model for others in how to reach out, mentor and engage new professionals and experienced collages.”

To read the whole article, see: http://www.acrl.ala.org/acrlinsider/2010/01/21/maureen-sullivan-named-acrl-academicresearch-librarian-of-the-year/

Congrats Maureen on this well-deserved honor, and thank you for all you have done for the Emerging Leaders program!!

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Internet Resources and Services Interest Group (LITA - Library and Information Technology Association)

Discussion Midwinter 2010 meeting notes

by Xan Arch on Fri, Jan 22, 2010 at 03:18 pm

The IG vice-chair, Mary A. Axford, opened the meeting by introducing herself, followed by introductions from the rest of the attendees.  Attending were two of the three speakers and the moderator for IRSIG's program at Annual 2010; Marshall Breeding (Vanderbilt University), Stephen Abram (Gale Cengage), and Roy Tennant (OCLC).  The third speaker will be Karen Schneider from Holy Names University. Also in attendance were several other ALA members.

The IG vice-chair, Mary A. Axford, opened the meeting by introducing herself, followed by introductions from the rest of the attendees.  Attending were two of the three speakers and the moderator for IRSIG's program at Annual 2010; Marshall Breeding (Vanderbilt University), Stephen Abram (Gale Cengage), and Roy Tennant (OCLC).  The third speaker will be Karen Schneider from Holy Names University. Also in attendance were several other ALA members.

Roy Tennant, the debate moderator, started the discussion of the upcoming Ultimate Debate: Free Beer or Free Puppy? Open Source vs. Proprietary Software.  He said that there would be a list of questions drawn up that the panel members would see in advance, but he also planned to take questions during the program from Twitter. 

The group discussed potential debate questions, and made a short draft list for consideration.

Next the group considered possible discussion topics for the IRSIG business meeting at ALA Annual. A companion topic to the Debate was decided on; the business meeting will include a discussion of open source communication tools and short presentations from attendees with ongoing projects.

Finally, the group elected a new vice-chair, Sarah Passonneau from Iowa State University. Sarah will move into the vice-chair position after ALA Annual 2010.

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2010 Emerging Leaders Project J (ITTS Web 2.0 Survey) [Community]

Event First Meeting - J Group

by Susan Jennings on Fri, Jan 15, 2010 at 02:03 pm

Chen to facilitate

Mirza to take notes

Add to brainstorming doc by Jan 25th

GODORT Web Managers Group

Discussion No winner to the 2009 GODORT logo contest

by John Stevenson on Fri, Jan 22, 2010 at 11:17 am

The votes are in and the decision not to award a prize for any entry in the 2009 GODORT logo contest was unanimous. The result will be reported to Steering and the Web Managers Group should discuss the best course to take from here.  Thanks to all those who contributed to the discussion and voted on the entries.

The votes are in and the decision not to award a prize for any entry in the 2009 GODORT logo contest was unanimous. The result will be reported to Steering and the Web Managers Group should discuss the best course to take from here.  Thanks to all those who contributed to the discussion and voted on the entries.

John A. Stevenson
Chair, GODORT Publications Committee, and
Coordinator, Government Documents and Maps Processing Unit
University of Delaware Library
181 S. College Ave.
Newark, DE 19717-5267
302 831-8671
varken@UDel.edu

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