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ACRL IS (Instruction Section)

Event ALA Midwinter - Boston

by Clara Fowler (non-member) on Tue, Nov 10, 2009 at 01:42 pm
ALA Emerging Leaders Interest Group

Discussion Call to Volunteer for ALA Committees

by Beatrice Calvin (staff) on Thu, Nov 5, 2009 at 02:11 pm

This is posted on behalf of ALA President-elect, Roberta A. Stevens.

 

Dear Colleagues:

 

When I ran for ALA President, I pledged to provide members who want to play a meaningful role in ALA the opportunity to do so. I am asking for your help in making this promise a reality.

 

One of the most important responsibilities I will undertake as ALA President-elect is to make appointments to the ALA and Council committees in collaboration with the Committee on Appointments (COA) and the Committee on Committees (COC).

 

This is posted on behalf of ALA President-elect, Roberta A. Stevens.

 

Dear Colleagues:

 

When I ran for ALA President, I pledged to provide members who want to play a meaningful role in ALA the opportunity to do so. I am asking for your help in making this promise a reality.

 

One of the most important responsibilities I will undertake as ALA President-elect is to make appointments to the ALA and Council committees in collaboration with the Committee on Appointments (COA) and the Committee on Committees (COC).

 

To ensure diversity on all ALA and Council committees, I am seeking ALA members who represent racial and ethnic diversity; a variety of types and sizes of libraries, areas of the country, and work experience; and experience in participating in ALA.  In addition (and importantly), one of my goals this year is to encourage the involvement of newer members, members previously not active, and active members who have never been formally appointed to serve on committees.  I would especially appreciate your forwarding to me the names of those who are new to ALA and to the profession so I can consider them for appointment as committee members or interns.

 

Serving on an ALA or Council committee provides members with leadership training, networking opportunities, and experience in working on specific association topics.  I know that, as a member-leader, you have a broad knowledge of the kinds of people I am looking for.  Therefore, I would be grateful for your help in encouraging interested member-volunteers who would be good choices for appointment to serve on the committees listed here: 

 

Accreditation; American Libraries Advisory; Awards; Budget Analysis and Review; Chapter Relations; Conference; Constitution and Bylaws; Council Orientation; Diversity; Education

Election; Human Resource Development and Recruitment Advisory; Information Technology Policy Advisory; Intellectual Freedom; International Relations; Legislation; Library Advocacy; Literacy; Literacy and Outreach Services Advisory; Membership; Membership Meetings; Organization; Policy Monitoring (current Council members only); Professional Ethics; Public and Cultural Programs Advisory; Public Awareness; Publishing; Research and Statistics; Resolutions; Rural Native and Tribal Libraries of All Kinds; Scholarships and Study Grants; Status of Women in Librarianship; Training, Orientation and Leadership Development; Website Advisory; ALA-Children*s Book Council (Joint Committee); ALA-Association of American Publishers (Joint Committee); and the ALA-Society of American Archivists/American Association of Museums (Joint Committee).

 

Anyone who would like to serve on one of the above committees must complete the committee volunteer form available at http://tinyurl.com/ybpgsm9.  The deadline for completing the ALA committee volunteer form is Friday, December 4, 2009.

 

I will also be organizing a number of task forces for my Presidential year to explore ways in which we can continue to transform the association for the 21st century.  Individuals who are not appointed to a committee will have the opportunity to be tapped for one of these groups.

 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at:

 

Roberta A. Stevens

Outreach Projects and Partnerships Officer The Library of Congress

Development Office   

101 Independence Avenue, SE

Washington, DC 20540-1400

E-mail: rste@loc.gov

Work: (202) 707-1550

Fax: (202) 707-0312

 

Thank you again for helping me, COA and COC bring new voices into participatory and leadership roles in our dynamic association.

 

Sincerely,

 

Roberta A. Stevens

ALA President-elect

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ALA 2015 Environmental Scan

Discussion Michigan Association for Media in Education (MAME) Planning Forum

by Michael Dowling on Tue, Nov 10, 2009 at 10:28 am

Suggested areas of focus for ALA from Michigan school librarians, media specialits.

Literacy for All

Discussion Breakthrough Learning in the Digital Age -- a very brief reflection

by Dale Lipschultz (staff) on Mon, Nov 9, 2009 at 02:36 pm

Last week, I attended a forum hosted by the MacArthur Foundation and Sesame Workshop at Google headquarters in Silicone Valley. The forum, Breakthrough Learning in the Digital Age addressed the challenge of driving national innovation to promote student success. The two day meeting was filled (actually jammed) with presentations by extraordinary speakers, thinkers, and doers from philanthropy, academia, government, the media, and the corporate technology sector.

Last week, I attended a forum hosted by the MacArthur Foundation and Sesame Workshop at Google headquarters in Silicone Valley. The forum, Breakthrough Learning in the Digital Age addressed the challenge of driving national innovation to promote student success. The two day meeting was filled (actually jammed) with presentations by extraordinary speakers, thinkers, and doers from philanthropy, academia, government, the media, and the corporate technology sector.

 Even though I took reams of notes I’m not going to summarize the presentations nor wax poetic about the setting. Just one caveat, it was very cool to meet Grover live and in person. I learned – or maybe I always knew – that you’re never too old to be captivated by a Muppet.

 Not surprisingly, literacy was either explicitly or implicitly part of every presentation and discussion. Literacy is, and always will be, the theme and thread that runs through learning regardless of setting, learning tools, and the state of technology. Of course, I saw everything through the lens of libraries and literacy.

 I think Connie Yowell from the MacArthur Foundation provide the best synthesis when she opened the Forum. 

 Kids are becoming digitally literate outside of school.

  • The ‘opportunity to learn’ gap is not about the use of technology, but the participatory aspect.
  • There needs to be a conceptual shift from:
    • Educating to learning
    • Consumption to participation
    • Institutions to networks
  • What this …Forum… isn’t about.
    • It’s not about technology. It’s about the social practices around technology.
    • It’s not about schools. Schools are a node in the system.
    • It’s not about getting rid of skills. It’s about the convergence of skills.
  • This Forum is an opportunity to re-imagine learning and systems.
    • What system would we want to build for the next generation?
    • There’s a sense of urgency over a long timeframe.

 A recent email indicated that the proceeding would be posted online ‘soon’. In the meantime, check out agenda and the speakers. http://www.google.com/events/digitalage/index.html

 As always, let me know if you want more information. I can always pull from my reams of notes.

 Sincerely,

Dale

 

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Health Sciences Interest Group (ACRL)

Discussion Medical Records Resources at the National Library of Medicine® (NLM®)

by Cynthia Burke on Mon, Nov 9, 2009 at 11:58 am

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) responds to more than 100,000 questions each year. Regularly asked questions become Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). NLM Reference and Consumer Health FAQs are at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/faqref.html . We review and update our FAQs frequently. FAQs often include national and international government agencies and non-profit organizations. One of our FAQs is about getting a copy of your medical records and medical records privacy.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) responds to more than 100,000 questions each year. Regularly asked questions become Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). NLM Reference and Consumer Health FAQs are at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/faqref.html . We review and update our FAQs frequently. FAQs often include national and international government agencies and non-profit organizations. One of our FAQs is about getting a copy of your medical records and medical records privacy.

The FAQ “Medical Records,” is at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/medical_records.html . It answers the questions 1) Where can I get a copy of my medical records? and 2) How private are my medical records? The FAQ includes links for active duty military and veterans. Under “Related Questions,” there is a link to the US and international hospitals FAQ.

Send your comments about this resource or research assistance questions to our contact form at http://apps.nlm.nih.gov/mainweb/siebel/nlm/index.cfm .

Cynthia Burke, MLS, AHIP
Reference Librarian
National Library of Medicine
URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov
The National Library of Medicine is part of the National Institutes of Health,
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries)

Discussion Medical Records Resources at the National Library of Medicine® (NLM®)

by Cynthia Burke on Mon, Nov 9, 2009 at 11:57 am

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) responds to more than 100,000 questions each year. Regularly asked questions become Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). NLM Reference and Consumer Health FAQs are at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/faqref.html . We review and update our FAQs frequently. FAQs often include national and international government agencies and non-profit organizations. One of our FAQs is about getting a copy of your medical records and medical records privacy.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) responds to more than 100,000 questions each year. Regularly asked questions become Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). NLM Reference and Consumer Health FAQs are at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/faqref.html . We review and update our FAQs frequently. FAQs often include national and international government agencies and non-profit organizations. One of our FAQs is about getting a copy of your medical records and medical records privacy.

The FAQ “Medical Records,” is at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/services/medical_records.html . It answers the questions 1) Where can I get a copy of my medical records? and 2) How private are my medical records? The FAQ includes links for active duty military and veterans. Under “Related Questions,” there is a link to the US and international hospitals FAQ.

Send your comments about this resource or research assistance questions to our contact form at http://apps.nlm.nih.gov/mainweb/siebel/nlm/index.cfm .

Cynthia Burke, MLS, AHIP
Reference Librarian
National Library of Medicine
URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov
The National Library of Medicine is part of the National Institutes of Health,
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

More...

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